Featured Condtion/Disease: Ear Infections

We are featuring a childhood/infant disease or condition informational post every other Friday.  Today's topic is Ear Infections.

Definition

Overview of Ear Infections

There are three main kinds of ear infections, which are called acute otitis (oh-TIE-tus) media (AOM), otitis media with effusion (uh-FEW-zhun) (OME), and otitis externa (Swimmer�s Ear). Sometimes ear infections can be painful and may even need antibiotics. Your healthcare provider will be able to determine what kind of ear infection you or your child has and if antibiotics would help.

Acute otitis media

The type of ear infection that is usually painful and may improve with antibiotic treatment is called acute otitis (oh-TIE-tus) media, or AOM. Symptoms of AOM include pain, redness of the eardrum, pus in the ear, and fever. Children may pull on the affected ear, and infants or toddlers may be irritable. Antibiotics are often prescribed to children for AOM, but are not always necessary.

Otitis media with effusion

Otitis media with effusion (uh-FEW-zhun), or OME, is a build up of fluid in the middle ear without signs and symptoms of acute infection (pain, redness of the eardrum, pus, and fever). OME is more common than AOM, and may be caused by viral upper respiratory infections, allergies, or exposure to irritants (such as cigarette smoke). The build up of fluid in the middle ear does not usually cause pain and almost always goes away on its own. OME will not usually benefit from antibiotic treatment.

Otitis externa (Swimmer�s Ear)

Otitis externa, more commonly known as Swimmer�s Ear, is an infection of the ear and/or outer ear canal. It can cause the ear to itch or become red and inflamed so that head movement or touching of the ear is very painful. There may also be pus that drains from the ear.  Antibiotics are usually needed to treat otitis externa.

Symptons

Acute otitis media (AOM)

  • Pulling at ears
  • Excessive crying
  • Fluid draining from ears
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Fever
  • Headaches
  • Problems with hearing
  • Irritability
  • Difficulty balancing

Otitis media with effusion (OME)

  • Problems with hearing
More Information

To get more information about ear infections, click here. 


 

*Most of the information provided here is from the CDC site, click here to visit their site.

Featured Condtion/Disease: Type 2 Diabetes

We are featuring a childhood/infant disease or condition informational post every other Friday.  Today's topic is Diabetes.

Definition

Diabetes is a condition in which people have abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in their blood. There are two main types of diabetes, Type 1 and Type 2.

Type 2 diabetes is by far the more common type of diabetes. It accounts for over 90% of all diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes was once known as "adult-onset diabetes" but this term is no longer used because Type 2 is on the rise in all age groups, including among children. Type 2 is increasing primarily because more children and adults are becoming overweight and obese.

People with diabetes lose the ability to control the level of sugar in their blood. Sugar rises to excessive levels in the blood because it can't enter the cells of the body - in the usual way and because an excess of sugar is produced in the liver. So, for example, without sugar getting inside the muscle cells, these cells don't have enough fuel to keep the body working properly. The same is true for other cell types throughout the body.
The main feature of type 2 diabetes is the body's resistance to the action of insulin in the cells. This is a condition known as insulin resistance. Obesity may be the single most important factor in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

More Information

To get more information on Type 2 Diabetes, click here. 

*Most of the information provided here is from the Children with DIABETES site, click here to visit their site.

Featured Condtion/Disease: Group B Strep

We are featuring a childhood/infant disease or condition informational post every other Friday.  Today's topic is Group B Strep.


Definition

Group B strep (GBS) is a type of bacteria that is often found in the vagina and rectum of healthy women. In the United States, about 1  in 4 women carry this type of bacteria. Women of any race or ethnicity can carry these bacteria. Being a carrier for these bacteria does not mean you have an infection. It only means that you have group B strep bacteria in your body.

Finding the GBS bacteria does not mean that you are not clean, and it does not mean that you have a sexually transmitted disease. The bacteria are not spread from food, sex, water, or anything that you might have come into contact with. They can come and go naturally in the body.

GBS can be passed from a mother to her baby during childbirth.

GBS is a leading cause of life-threatening infections in newborns, including pneumonia (lung infection), sepsis (blood infection), meningitis (infection of the lining of the brain and spinal cord), and other problems. Sadly, many infants can die or have serious long-term effects from a GBS infection.


Preventing Group B Strep in New Borns


Ask your doctor or nurse for a GBS test when you are 35�37 weeks pregnant (in your 9th month). The test is an easy swab of the vagina and rectum that should not hurt.
Each time you are pregnant, you need to be tested for GBS. It doesn't matter if you did or did not have this type of bacteria before; each pregnancy is different.

Carrying GBS bacteria does not mean that you are not clean, and it does not mean that you have a sexually transmitted disease. The bacteria are not spread from food, sex, water, or anything that you might have come into contact with. They can come and go naturally in the body.

The medicine to stop GBS from spreading to your baby is an antibiotic given during labor. The antibiotic (usually penicillin) is given to you through an IV (in the vein) during childbirth. If you are allergic to penicillin, there are other ways to help treat you during labor.

Antibiotics taken before labor will not protect your baby against GBS. The bacteria can grow back so fast that taking the medicine before you begin labor does not prevent the bacteria from spreading to your baby during childbirth.

Other people in the house, including kids, are not at risk of getting sick from GBS.  If you think you might have a C-section or go into labor early (prematurely), talk with your doctor or nurse about your personal GBS plan.

More Information

To get more information about Group B Strep and its prevention in New Born Infants, go here.